PREVIOUS HOUR

kgg/2a/1.00

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (contd.): As far as children are concerned, when you talk about underweight children, when you talk about increasing and developing the health of the children, the single most important issue you have to deal with is drinking water.

Sir, today, we are not able to deal with drinking water and even the treatment of drinking water. Out of every hundred children, I believe, only 26 children have been given the oral rehydration; that is, only 26% of those who required. So, this is the situation, which is a direct result, I would say, of the new liberal framework and unfortunately, this Government and the Health Ministry are not very clear on this path.

Sir, coming to the public health, and coming to the new initiatives which have been taken by the Government, I think, it is too early now to make a comprehensive assessment of the National Rural Health Mission. My party has welcomed the National Rural Health Mission. We believe that it is a very important initiative. There are 3-4 very important positive points on this. One is the convergence; because in vertical programmes we are now having convergence. The second is the community participation, I think, it is extremely important to have much wider community participation in rural health programmes. Then, a very important initiative taken by this Government is to shift the focus by equating health with population control, which has dogged the health programmes for the last 10-15 years of this country; health means population control. It is good that the National Rural Health Mission has shifted focus, even though there are seven States where very cruel disincentives are there in the name of population control which should be removed, but, still, this is an initiative taken by the Central Government which we welcome.

I would like the Minister to respond to three issues which I want to flag conceptually about the National Rural Health Mission. The first is, I have been given to believe that in some of the MoUs which have been signed by the State Governments, in some areas, greater emphasis is being put to shift to a user-fee regime. Since public health is really and basically used by the poor in this country, I believe that to put a user-fee regime leads to a situation where even those bodies which have other roles to play start pushing user-fee. For example, you have got a very good scheme called the Rogi Kalyan Samiti, a monitoring scheme in all the hospitals. It is a very good scheme. I do not know how many rogis we have here and how much kalyan. That is a different issue. But, any way, unfortunately, a study of the Rogi Kalyan Samitis show that their main role today is to be concerned with the financial viability of that particular public health institution. Now, they have got into this game of on which user-fee can be charged, on which practice, on which test. If you have user-fee as part of National Rural Health Mission, you are going to get into trouble. I would ask the Health Minister to make a categorical assurance that user-fee is not going to be part of the National Rural Health Mission.

Secondly, I find that while it is essential to bridge the rural-urban gap we should not totally marginalise the urban health schemes and systems as we seem to be doing now. Therefore, this again is a very crucial aspect of the current health policy. While it is essential to cover a gap, we should not be creating another gap. While looking at your figures, except in the flexible pool, Sir, where there is a floating fund I do not find where actually the urban health services are. We know what the health situation in urban slums is. In fact, in many areas it is worse than the rural areas. So, I would like the Minister to address this urban health issue.

The third important issue in the National Rural Health Mission is, Sir, it is beyond my comprehension as to what actually the Government is thinking on this. This entire scheme is built on the frail shoulders of a poor woman called ASHA, Accredited Social Health Activist. She is the crucial key in the rural health. Very good, we want it; community participation in health should be there; Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes women who are there from the hamlet habitations should be brought in, it is essential. But, Sir, who is going to look after ASHA?

(Contd. by kls/2b)

KLS/2B-1.05

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (CONTD): This scheme gives ten jobs for Asha to do, something like Anganwadi or only worse because she is at the bottom of the ladder. But who is going to look after Asha, who is going to pay Asha? They say only three to four hours she has to work. But if you look at the kind of job that they are given, it is absolutely a mockery to have the whole mission based on Asha and you do not have single paise for Asha, a trillion dollar economy, and no payment to the poor woman who is going to do the major work of the community health work. I think it is a shameful thing. Therefore, I would request the Minister to clearly come out and say what he is going to do about Asha and where the payment is coming from because my own apprehension is you are going to introduce user fees in the villages saying Asha goes to this house, she takes this much money. And I tell you the Panchayats...(Interruptions)... I know that. ...(Interruptions)... Dr. Ramdoss, if it is not so, kindly inform me because I know what is happening in many of the Panchayats today. You say they are under Panchayats. Panchayats are telling them, "We do not have money to give you. We have not got money for you; therefore, you go house-to-house and collect money from every baby that you weigh. So, we know how things work. Therefore, Please do not escape your responsibility in this. A very, very important part of the Rural Health Mission is building up of infrastructure. I think this is most crucial and extremely welcome part of the Rural Health Mission and I congratulate the Minister on the concept of it. But what is the reality? Now you have a three tier system -- you have a sub-centre, you have a Primary Health Centre, you have a Community Health Centre and then you come to tertiary sector, thus starting from the Sub-centre, the Sub-centre based on the two people, the ANM and the Multipurpose Health Worker. Sir, today if you look even now in many States of the country, the ANMs who are paid by the Centre, are paid only according to the 1991 population norms. So, you are talking about expanding health but your Sub-centres are based on the 1991 norms. Then apart from that today you require minimum of two lakh more ANMs if you are going to have two ANMs per centre. Where is it? You do not have any training schools of ANMs. Now, I know in West Bengal, recently 70 training schools have been put for ANMs. But the point is you want to have a Sub-centre, ANMs are crucial. Do not marginalize ANMs and put it on Asha who is going to be unpaid and since you are not paying Asha, you have to pay ANMs, so forget the ANMs. Please do not do that. It is going to be disastrous for Sub-centre, which is crucial for community health. And secondly, I come to the Primary Health Centres. I do not know. Now what the Government figures are showing is a huge backlog of building for Primary Health Centres, there is huge backlog of personnel for Primary Health Centres. I have got all the figures. I don't want to take the time of the House except to say that it is a huge amount and if you want to get the Rural Health Mission to really work, you have to put that much more money into the physical infrastructure and also into the social infrastructure. Now, all of us know that people do not want to go to rural areas. ...(Interruptions)... They do not want to go to rural areas. ...(Interruptions)... Mr. Narayanasamy is saying something. ...(Interruptions)... Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry, I think, have a much better system there. Our Minister, since he is from that State, I do not know how aware he is about what is happening in other States. But the fact of the matter is that they do not want to go. Now, can you blame them? Your medical education system is so much in the grip of private institutes who consider medical education to be profit and you are going to charge Rs.35 lakh to get into a medical college and you expect him to go to the rural areas where there is no hospital, where there is no nurse, where there is no lab technicians. Is he going to do it? Sir, many of our Government Committees...

MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: Brindaji, you have to conclude.

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: Sir, I have got some more points.

MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: I have given you much more time.

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: Sir, the Chairman told me that I do have about half-an-hour. I am just going to complete. ...(Interruptions)...

MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: Yes, yes, you have been given half-an-hour. But I want to remind you that half-an-hour is over. ...(Interruptions)...

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: Sir, I am not going to take much more time. ...(Interruptions)... The Minister has also agreed. ...(Interruptions)...

MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: But I have to regulate others also. ...(Interruptions)...

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: We do not get an opportunity ever to speak on health. ...(Interruptions)...

MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN: You can give her your Party's time. ...(Interruptions)...

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: Sir, I would not take his time. ...(Interruptions)... (Followed by 2C/sss)

-KLS-SSS/2C/1.10

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (CONTD.): So, many Government Committees have recommended to make it essential and compulsory for doctors to go to rural areas. Now, recently, another Government Committee has come up with this. I believe, it is necessary; some internship can be sent to rural areas as part of training, it is necessary. But the point is, when you do that you also have to look at supplies, you have to look at where are you going to produce the doctors, where are you going to produce the nurses. Today you have only 200 nursing schools in the whole country, in the Government sector. The rest are all private. Can a young adivasi girl who wants to be a nurse, ever go and get admission? Therefore, if you want to solve the problem of doctors and nurses in rural areas, you have to produce more doctors, you have to produce more nurses, you have to stop depending on medical institutions which are in the private sector and this I don't find in the health policy at all. There is nothing. You have given Rs. 600 crores. For what? For OBCs to be included. Very good. As the first step it is good you have given Rs. 600 crores for the over-sight Committee. But what about money for new medical colleges in Government? Have you completely forgotten it or are you not interested? Sir, I told you, from the beginning they will talk about State Governments. I know it. They know it; we know that State Governments don't have money. But they are going to put the thing on the State Governments and in the meanwhile dharadhar they are going to give licences to every private medical institution with no regulations. Today we have seen that Madhya Pradesh Government had to cancel the licences of how many Government hospitals. It is 240. So, therefore, without giving sufficient attention to physical and social infrastructure we are not going. Then, Sir, the point that I want to make is, okay, even within your Health Ministry, I want to ask you what are your priorities? Is it or is it not a fact that today the most common ailments are Malaria, like Dengue, Japanese Encephalitis, Chikungunya? What is the priority that you are giving? Now, I know HIV AIDS. It is very important. I am fully for a programme, which sensitises the country against HIV AIDS. I want the Minister to say when is he bringing the legislation. Today, only seven per cent of all HIV AIDS patients are getting the drugs. But we know that money is mainly coming from US aid and foreign agencies. For them, HIV AIDS is a priority. Fine, I have no issue about them. Please don't mistake me. But, for the ailments, which our people are hugely affected! North-East, I have just come back from North-East. The major issue there is Malaria. Every second or third family is hit by Malaria. They cannot work. They can't do anything. Will you believe it that in 1.8 million cases of Malaria, only 10 per cent have the facility of blood testing? How many more are there? You will be shocked to hear that with great fanfare we have set up an Integrated Disease Surveillance System. Excellent, I am all for it. But, Chikungunya which spread over India in the last two years, do you know it was not included in the Surveillance System?

My dear friend Madhu will be very upset to hear that even though Chikungunya is bordering on the Minister's State, from what I see from the paper, I may be wrong, what I could see is that it is not included in the Surveillance System.

SHRI PENNUMALLI MADHU: Even Ministers were affected by Chikungunya.

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT: I say Ministers are mainly affected by reformitis but there may also be a special strain of Chikungunya only for Ministers. I don't say that. You are saying it but what I say is something serious. Malaria and other such basic issues, which are affecting our people, are not in the priority of this Government. One-third allocations within the Health Ministry relates rather to vector disease control than to HIV AIDS. Then you look at children. I am talking about priority. Sir, you will be shocked to hear that children's immunisation programme which is the bedrock of any public health system is to ensure immunisation for our children. Only 47 per cent children are covered. What is more frightening is that in some States, I think, seven States if I am not mistaken, the immunisation rate has gone down from 19 to 9 per cent.

(Contd. by NBR/2D)

-SSS/NBR-NB/2D/1.15.

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (CONTD.): It is going down. So what are we talking about? Cannot we do immunization for our children? Why? I don't know. I am not an expert. I don't know. But, I have been told by many people practising social medicine that in spite of Pulse Polio Programme, which set out a target for eradication of polio, unfortunately, now, especially, in UP and in other States, we found 600 more cases of polio. It shows that it has not really been eradicated. Similarly, what they say is, with the kind of attention that is being given to Pulse Polio Programme -- of course, it is essential -- not even 60 per cent of children is on immunization. Instead of both going and both increasing, one suffers because of the other. This is what I call wrong priorities of the Government, the Health Ministry and its impaired vision. That is what I want to state.

Now, Sir, there is one more good scheme. As I have said, 7 per cent of women die of maternal mortality. It is a very good scheme. They have started Janani Suraksha Yojana. I congratulate the hon. Minister for it. Sir, 21 lakh women are benefited. It is a record. Most of them are poor women. It is a very good initiative. I congratulate the hon. Minister and his Ministry for this. This Scheme is, conceptually, only for women over 19 years of age. Now, you know, in our country, girls between 16 and 18 years of age, 15 years of age, are producing children. We know that it is illegal. But, they are producing children. Can you punish them and say, 'because you are below 19 years, to get you to an institution, you are not going to be helped by the Government.' Is that the way to deal with them? I don't think so. And, secondly, they say that this benefit is extended up to only two children. Is this not a punishment for women? If she has two girls and her in-laws say to produce a son, in such case, you see she is either going for sex determination test or you take into account that, today, the reality for an Indian woman is they do not have control over their bodies and their own reproductive rights. Please understand that clearly. And, unless you understand that, unless you have that sensitivity towards what women in the country are facing, it is very difficult to solve this problem. You are the head of the PNDT Committee. You have taken a very good stand there. I heard you. I have seen your commitment there. I appreciate it. I think, under your leadership, some important steps are being taken to implement the Act. What did you say in the Committee? Does it match with Janani Suraksha Yojana? You want to punish a woman who, because of various social circumstances, may have to go in for a third child? Are you saying, 'Okay, you cannot die if you are producing two children in the institution; but, at home have your third child. If you die, it does not matter.' I mean, what are we saying with this? Therefore, on both these aspects, I would humbly request the hon. Minister to kindly look at it and to please relook at the scheme and keep it in conformity with the PNDT Act with your own understanding of declining sex ratio. You know how horrific it is. You have taken the initiative on it. Please bring that initiative into the Janani Suraksha Yojana and put an end to this discrimination and cruel discrimination in the name of population control.

Sir, the last point is, again, a very crucial point and that is on the whole issue of drugs. My own understanding -- I have discussed with many of our comrades who are working in this sector -- and everybody says that there is really a big problem here, because drug prices are under a different Ministry. So, drug control prices are under Chemical and Fertilizer Ministry, nothing to do with the Health Ministry. And, actual drug control is under Health Ministry. There is a problem here. I think there is an overlapping; I don't know who should have what. But, in any case, this is a serious problem, because the Government of India is supposed to supply drugs as part of the national health programme to Primary Health Centres. It has to supply drugs. At what price it supplies drugs is not under this Ministry, except it invites tenders and procures them? So, the problem of drug pricing is one of the biggest problems in the country where big pharma companies are minting money, literally. But, the Health Ministry and those who are concerned with health have no say in this. Therefore, this is one important issue. I just want to put it before you. I don't expect you to respond to it. There is a problem here. (CONTD. BY PB "2E")

PB/2E/1.20

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (CONTD.): Now, coming to the Drug Controller, I am very sorry to have to say this, but I have also had a personal experience in the working of Drug Control Authority. Why? It is because the Drug Control Authority is the Authority which gives licences for any new drug which come into the country. So, there is a huge scope here for different lobbies to work. I am afraid to say this. In my experience, I have found that the worst lobbying is going on in the Drug Control Authority. I am not talking about any particular officer. But the whole system itself is a totally non-transparent system. They have a technical advisory committee; they have other kinds of authorities, but the fact of the matter today is that the Drug Control Authority is responsible for the worst kind of medical practices that we are seeing. For example, it has a job. What is the job? The job is, take out drugs which have been shown, after some years of use, to be banned in other country. For example, take Baralgan. Now, you all know how Baralgan was used. We all used to use Baralgan. Now it is banned. But we used it for many years. If you look at the drugs which have been banned, Sir, you yourself and my other hon. friends will find that most of the drugs which have been taken off the market because of irrational combination of drugs is because of Public Interest Litigations. It is never through the Drug Control Authority. The Drug Control Authority is paralysed, as far as taking action against the pharmaceutical companies is concerned. It is paralysed. Why? One of the reasons is, -- you will be shocked to hear, Sir, -- in this huge Drug Control Authority which has got to do monitoring of retail, has got to do monitoring of the States -- and every State has its own Drug Control Authority -- there are a total of 29 officers only. So, what is the message that you are giving? It is, 'we don't want drug control'; 'we are not bothered about spurious drugs'; 'we don't care what the State Governments are doing about it' and like that. Instead of strengthening the Drug Control Authority, now, under the leadership of the Minister, what I have heard is that the Central Government also wants to take over the licensing of the manufacture of drugs. Baba, you can't deal with spurious drugs, you can't chase out the drugs which should not be sold in the Indian market. But now you want an added right where again, I am sorry to say, but I have to say, there is a lot of lobbying going on for licences to manufacture. And, therefore, the licences will be with the Central Health Ministry. Everything will be done by 29 officers who never do anything, even if they want to. They are officers of integrity. I have no issue with that. But, Sir, this is the situation of the Drug Control Authority. I demand, Sir, -- because we have seen the functioning of this Authority -- that we want the Minister to say what are the monitoring rules, what is the transparency they are going to bring up, how are they going to make it more participative, so that those who are not directly involved as pharmacists or lobbyists are going to be represented? So, you can have a monitoring committee. I request you to do that.

And, in this context, the issue of clinical trials comes up. Now, Sir, we didn't get a chance to speak on the Budget. But you will be shocked to know that today the Government of India is interested in outsourcing poor Indian bodies for clinical trials. We see it is going to be 1.5 billion industry. So, let all the pharmaceutical companies of the world come to India and experiment on Indians what they cannot do in their own countries. And, I am shocked to hear and to tell you, Sir, that the NDA Government and now the UPA Government have changed the Schedule Y of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act. Does the hon. Parliament know that this Schedule Y was a crucial protection against unethical clinical trials? There are three phases, the first phase, second phase and the third phase. Now, earlier in our country, the first phase was banned for any drug which is being tested there. Fine. In the second phase, earlier, it had to be conducted in the country of its origin. After it is conducted there, you can have a phase-II trial in India. Now, what has the Government of India done? It has removed the phase lag and it has now become concurrent. I have got examples of big German manufacturers. They have five people in Germany, they have 500 people here and say it is concurrent. This is the situation. (Contd. by 2f/SKC)

2F/1.2/ hms-skc

SHRIMATI BRINDA KARAT (CONTD.): This is the situation. Our Finance Minister does not want to levy even a single tax -- even though the BJP says it is a high-tax Government -- on the rich; but they want to remove the service tax for clinical trials. What are their priorities? I can only say, Indian women are not guinea pigs; we are totally opposed to this. (Interruption) Sir, that was the last point that I wanted to make.

I would like to give one last quotation. In 1987 the World Bank brought out a very influential document called "Financing Health Services in Developing Countries - An Agenda for Reform", and the World Bank stated, "The approach to healthcare in developing countries has been to treat it as a right of citizenry and to attempt to provide free services for everyone. This approach does not work."

This is what the World Bank had said. I would appeal to the hon. Minister that the Indian experience shows the opposite; for health to work, it has to be a universal right accessible to all. The World Bank is wrong, clearly and unambiguously wrong. I hope the Health Minister would agree with this and take into account some of the suggestions that I have made.

I thank you, Sir, for the opportunity. (Ends)

ֳ֯ : 0 ϳ

0 ϳ (֕ã֮) : ֮־֤, ֳ֯ן ߅ þã ׸ָ ߴ֟ Ӥ ָ ֓ ָ , ֻӟ ֯ ׾ֵ , ֟ health is wealth ԟ ׮ָ ֵօ , ֟ ִ ָ þã ִõ ָ ߱ ֟֟

, ֮֟ ֟ Ϭ֮ ӡ 0 ִ֮ 韾 ֻ 000 ָָ ֬և ִ ֮֟ ߛ, ߱ ִ þã ֣״ ִ ߾֮ ߓ ֻ ֮ ߾֮-֮֯ , ߱ ִ֟ , þã ׻֋ ֟ ֮ National Rural Health Mission ָָ , 10 ָ ֋ ֮ ו ָָ ָ ֵօ ֟ ֻ֟ 000 ָָ ִ ׻֋, ִ ׮־ ֻ ָ߲ ֮ ָָ ֟ ן ֮ Ӿֿ߻ ׻֋ ָָ ֬և

, ִ ד infrastructure ׾֟ ׻֋ ָ ׾׳֮ þã ׾ ׻֋ ֕ ָָ ו֮֟ ֵ פ ו ܟ ߙظ , ָָ ִ ֻ ־ֵ þã ן ֮ ֺ ־ ֣ ָָ ֵפ Ի ד ֨ן , ֓߮ ֻ ֻ , ׾֟ ׻֋ ֱ פ ָ ׾׳֮ ֮֋ ִ þã , ִֵָ ׮֙ ׾֟ וֻ և כ ׮֙ פ ֮ ֯ , և כ ׮֙ ו ֟ 15-20 ו ָ וֻ ִ ֻ֟ ֣״ ד ׾֬ ֯ , ָָ ֛ ֻײ (2 /ߋ־ ָ ֿ:)

-HMS/PSV-KSK/2G/1.30

0 ϳ (֟): ֓ ׻֋ ׻ֵ, ֙ևי , DPT, ߕֻ ׻֋ ָָ ָ ֕ ָָ ֯ ßָ ָ ֤֮ פ ֵ ׻ֵ ֮ ׻֋ ֕֙ 15 ֋ ֵ 'Ϭ֮ ӡ þã ֮' 6 ֋ AIIMS ïֻ֟ ֮ և , ִ ֛ ״ֻ߅ ־ֿ 13 ֮ ïֻ֟ ־߮ , ֮, ָָ ָ ֯ ֮ և

'֮֮ ֮' ִ ֋ , ָ ׿ ָ Ӭ׾ ָ כ߾ָ ׻֋ ïֻ֟ ֮ Ӥ ָ ָ ֻ 韵 ֯ ֟ ָָ ïֻ֟ כ߾ָ ֋, ֟ כ߾ָ ֣ ߾֮ , ׻֋ ָָ ֳԾ֟ ֆ 14 ֋ ׿ , ִ ֆ ֳ ״ֻ ֣ כ߾ָ ֻ 韵 ֓ ߅ ִ ָ ָ ָ ֯֜ և ׸ ו ָ כ߾ָ ׸֕ ֤ ֻ֟ , ׿ פ ֮ ִ ֆ ״ֻ ָָ ïֻ֟ ֟ כ߾ָ ָ ָָ ֆ þã ׻֋ ֵ

, ָָ 0և00 ִ ׻֋ ֯ ֋ ׮ָָ ױ , ïֻ֟ ו֋ ד פ , þã פ , ו֮֟ ֮֋ ֋, ֲ֤ ֟ Ӆ , ֟ ֲ ָָ ïֻ֟ ֟ , ֕ ֮ ֛--֛ ïֻ֟ , ֮ ִ և ִָ ֟օ ֛-֛ ïֻ֟ ָߕ ֮ ֤ ָָ ָ ֵ ׌֟ ֮ ָ ֮ ֮ - פ ִָ ֟ , ָ ֟ ֮֮ߵ þã ӡ , ֛ Ӿֿ߻ ָ֮ ו֮֟ ׬ ïֻ֟ ֮֋ -- ָָ ïֻ֟ ִ ָ ׿ֵ֟ -- ֻ ֱ ָָ ָ׵֟ ָָ ֮ ֛ ׵֟ ׮ֳֵ , ֕ ָָ ָ ֋ ֕֙-־ә ֕ ָָ ׮׿֟ ָ ֮ ïֻ֟ , ִ և ָ well-equipped Ӆ ָ , ֮ ָ ֲ ָ ֿ߮, ѓ ֿ߮ ֲָ , ֲ ׻ ֯ և ׌׮ ѓ ѓ ֮ ֮ , ֮ ִ֮֮ ֮ , ֤, ִ ֤ ֟ ߅ ïֻ֟ -־ , ֱ-ֱև ִד֟ ־ã , -- ד , ֈӛ , ֻ ׬ָ , օ ֲ ֻ , ײִ׸ ֻ ? ֮ ָ֮ , ָߕ ֮ ָ֮ , ֮ ߱ ֟֟ , ֮ ߛ ֟ ? ד ֲ ֻ , ָ ָ ֻ, Ԯ ־ã ָָ ָ ֿ ֮ , ָߕ ֻ ָ ָ֮ (2/000 ָ ֿ:)

2H/klg/1.35

0 ϳ (֟) : , ֟ , ֌ Ӥ ֕ ֮ ïֻ ӿ֮ ׸ ֵ ֿ ֮ ֟ ֟ ֯ ֟ , ߾֤֮׵֮ և , þã ׻֋ ־ֿ ֋ , 滵 ָ ׮ֵӡ , ߴ֟ ָ ׮ֵӡ ֮ ־ֿ , ׌ ֲ ߱ ָ , ָ߲ ָ֬ ֵ֟ , ֮ Ի֕ ֮ ׻֋ ׾־ֿ ֟ ֮ ֮ Ի֕ ֮ ֛

, ָ ״֛ ָָ ïֻ֟ ֵ֕ ֱ ׻֋ և ïֻ֟ ֣״ , ֟ ָ ׌֟ ֮ פ ֋, ֟ , ֟ ֱ-ֱև ֤ ֮ ָ֟ ָ և ïֻ֟ ֮ ֤ Ӥ , ֻ ׻֋ ֛ , ٣ ֮ ֛ ָָ ïֻ֟ ݵ , ָ ִד֟ ֱ-ֱև -־ ־ã , օ ׻֋ ־ֿ ו֮֟ ׬ ïֻ֟ ־ã , ר ִ ִד֟ ֮ פ ֋

, ָ ֟ ׸ֻ ïֻ֟ ִ ָ ִ֮֮ ֟ , ׸ֻ ִ ֟օ Ӥ ִ ֤ ִ ָ פ ֟ ִ ָ ãןֵ ֮ ֟ ָ ׌ ߛ ָ ïֻ֟ ֟ , ֟ ֟ ֮-֮ , ָ ׌ ֵ֟ , ־ֲ פ ֟ , ԙ ָ 韵 ߲ , פ ֟ ֻ ָָ ׮׿֟ ֿ ԙ ãן , ֌ ־ֻ ïֻ֟ ֋, ԙ ׮֟ ïֻ֟ , ׸ֻ ïֻ֟ և ïֻ֟ , ԙß ׌ Ի֕ ׻֋ ֟ , ׻֋ ־ã , ו ָ ׾֤ , ԙ כ ׌ Ի֕ ֲ ָ֟ ׮ ֋, ֋, Ùߙ , ïֻ֟ ד ״ֻ֮ ־ã ׻֋ ָָ ׾ָ֓ ָ ׻֋ ׾֬ ֮ , ־ã

, ֕ ׻֋ ֟ ֕ ßãן ו֮֟ ׬ և דֵֻ ֋ , ו֮֟ ׬ և ׮ ֋ , ִ֮֮ ֟ ֕ Ի֕ ֕ ִ ָߕ ֮ , ָ ָߕ ָߕ ִ Ùָ ִ ֻ ֮ , ׾ָָ֓ ֤־ ֵ , ו ד ׾ֿ ־ֵ ֵ ؓ֟ ׾ֵ ָߕ פ , פ Ի֕ ֤ , ָߕ - פ ֟߅ ָ ִ֮֮ ֟ , ִ֮֮ ӓ և ֟ ӓ ׻֋ ִ֮֮ ׻֋ ֟ ֕ ָ ָߕ ׻ - ӓ ֆ ָ פ ֤ : ָ ֮ ֯ ӓ : և, ֮ פ ӓ և , ӓ ׸ꌙ פ ֋օ ֮ ٣ ָ ִ ֤ ֋? ؓ֟ ׾ֵ ׻֋ פ ָָ ֿ ׮׿֟ ׬׬ ӓ ãׯ֟ , ִ ֤, ָ߲ ֤ ׻֋ ׮ֿ ־ã ״ֻ ֮ ָ߸ , ֮ þã ָ , ӓ , ו ָ ־ֿ ٣ ָ ֛

, ָ ֟ ߴ-ߴ ֟ ײ֟ , ׾ֿ ו֮ ׿ָ ִ ֟ ߴ-ߴ Ի֕ , ָ ߴָ ֟ , ߴ׸ ָ ֟ ָ Ի֕ ָ

2/ ָ

aka-sk/2j/1:40

0 ϳ (֟) : ãִ, ֵײ֙ߕ, և ֛ ָ, ֙ כߕ, ך פ ӳ߸ ߴ׸ ׻֋ ֋ פ 00 ָ, ֲָ כ ֛-֛ ׾֮֯ ֟ ׾֮֯ ָ ֟ , և ֮ ֟ , և פ ֵ , ֕ ָ , ֵ ֵ , וֲ և ֕ ֮ ָָ , ֲ ָָ ֺ ׮׿֟ , ָ ׾֮֯ ֵֻ֕ ׿ָ ֱ ٣ ֲԤ ָ ד֟ ֵ֤ ֟ ִ֮֮ ֟ , ֕ ָָ ׾ֵ , ָ ֺ , ׮ֵӡ ָ ־ֿ ֕ ָ, ֵ ײֻ ֮֟ , , ִ ֤ ֕ ֋ ײ֮ ֕ ? ׌ ׻֋ ד ֣״ ֺ ײ֮ ٣ ָ ֋ ד ׾֬ ״ֻ, ׮׿֟ ־ã ֮ , ֌ ֮ ִ֮֮ ֋, ָ ׮ֵӡ ָָ ִ֮

, ִ֟ ִ ֆ ֓ ןֿ֟ ׬ ֵ ֟ ָ ִ ֆ ָ ״ֻ ֟, ֟-֤֕ , ָ֬ ãן , ָ֤֟ ָ ׮ֳԸ ֤֕ ֮֕Ԯ ״֟ ׸ , ָ ָ ֟韾 ן׸ ָ י ָ ߮ և, ׻֋ ӟ֮ ֮ ֛ ӿ ֻ֮ ׻֋ ױ Ϥ֟ ֵԾָ פ ָ ־ ֲ ֛ ߕ , ߴ׸ ֛ , ִ ׬ӿ ã֮ ָ և ㌟ ֻ Ϥ֟ ֻ֕ ߴ׸ ֮ , ֻ ָָ ָ ֮ פ þ֓ ֻ֕ ִ ֲֻ ׻֋ ֱ ֕֙ ֲә ֵ ָ þ֓ ֻ֕ ִ ֲֻ ߴ׸ ֋, ߴ׸ ֯ ֮ ׌ ֓ ֋ ָ ֋ ߴ׸ ֕ ָ ֓ ֛ ׻֋, , ָ ֣״ ׾ָ֓ ֮ ׬ ֮ פ ֮ ־ֿ և ㌟ ֻ Ϥ֟ ֻ ߮ ֓ þ֓ ֻ֕ ״ֻ ߴ׸ ߱ ֓ ߴ׸ ׮ָ ֮ ֮ ֻ ֌ ֓

, ֻ þã ֛ ӳ߸ ָָ ֵ ָָ , ֕֙ ֲә , ָָ ߵ֟ ִ , 100 ֲ֤ ֤ , ֮ ֲ֤ ֜ ֟ Ù׻ֵ ֮ , ׸ָ ֮ ֵ ָָ , ָָ ߔ ׿, Ӭ׾ ӟ֮ ָ , ׾׳֮ ָ , ׻֋ ֵ֤ ׿ ָ ֵ ָָ ָ ׸ ׿֟ ׿ֿ ׸ָ ׻֋ ֕ ָָ ׵֟ ֆ þã ָ ֓ ֓ ָ ״ֻ þã , ׿ ״ֻ ........ (2k/sch' ָ ָ)

SCH/1.45/2K

. ϳ (ִ֟): ֟֋ ãã ߑԕ߾ , ׻֋ ֺ ׸ָ ׾ֵ ֺ ׿֟ ֋ ֕ ָָ ָ ָ ֮ פ ֮ ־ֿ ֻ ׸ָ ׮ֵ֮ ֲә ׻֋ ֋ ֟ , ׻֋ ֮֋ ֮և և , ױ ׸ָ ׮ֵ֮ ִֻ ֮ ֱ֟ ״ֻ , ו֮֟ ״ֻ֮ ׻֋ ϓָ ׳ֵ֮ ֵֻ ֋, ו þֵ ֟ , ִ ֕ ֟ ָ ָ֮ ֮ ָ ןֵ ֻ֟ ָ֋ , ׌ ״ֻ, ׻֋ כ ָ ָ ֯ ϳ־ֻֿ ϓָ ׳ֵ֮ ֻ֋ ֮ ־ֿ ֓ þã ָ , ֓ ָ ״ֻ ֆ þã ֳ օ

, ׯ֔ ֻ׸, , ד׮ֵ ӳ߸ ߴ׸ ֯ ßָ ָ , כ͟ ֮ ևՅ ߴ׸ ֓ ָ ֮ ָ ߱ ֮֟ ֛߅ , ֓ ָ ׻֋ ֿ߮ ֱ ה־ , ֟ þã ֮ ֋, ׻֋ ֵ Ӥ פ ֵ ֓ ֓ ִ ׻֋ ֵ ָ ߴ׸ ֮ ֋, ָ֟ ִ ֋, ױ ֓ ֮֯ ױ ָ פ ִ֮ ֋߅ ד׮ֵ ߴ׸, , ߴ׸ ִֵ ֮ ֯ , ֲ ֕ ָ ׮ֵ ד ֱ ׾֟ ׸ãןֵ ָ ׮ֵӡ ֋, ׻֋ ָָ ָ ϳ־ ֮ ֮և ֮

, ָ ևיÙ ָָ ֓ ָ ֛-֛ ӳ߸ ߴ׸ ֕ ֮֟ , Ի ָ ֤ Ի և ׮ֵ פ ֟ , ו ֳ և ׮ֵ ֟ ָָ ָ ֵ ֟ ׾׳֮ ӳ߸ ߴ׸ ֕ ׻֋ Ի ׾֟ ֟ , ֳ և ׮ֵ ֟ ָ ָָ ֲ ָָ և ׮ֵ Ի , Ի ׮׿֟ և ׮ֵ , ׬ 滵 ׮ֵס֟ 滵 ߿֮ ָ 滵 ׮ֵӡ ֤ Ի פ ֮ , ֆ ߴ֟ ָ ׮ֵӡ ָ

ӟ ֛ ֲ ֟ ־ֿ ֟ ֲ-ֲ ֻ և כ ׿ ã֮ ֮ ׬ ܵ ָ ֵ ִ֮֮ Ӥ ֤, Ù ݵ ֮ ׻ֵ ֟ ԟֵ ݵ ֋ , և כ ã֮ ׿ ֯ ׻֋ ֵ Ӥ פ ݵ֟ ֤֯ ֕ ֵ , ָ , ֕ ־ ָ߲ ֲ ֓ ָ ׸ כ Ùߙ֮ Ͼ ׻֋ ןֿ֟ פ ֟ - ןš ֻ ָ ָ ֟ ֛ ׾ֳָ ָ ̸֕ ֟ MCM/2L ָ ָ

MCM-VKK/2L/1-50

0 ϳ (֟) : ִ ֯ע ֋ Ӥ כ Ùߙ֮ ϴ ֡ ݵ ֡ ֮֟ , ݵ֟ ֤֮ ָ ִ ֮֟ ָ 000 ׸ ןֿ֟ ֕ ָ כ Ùߙ֮ Ͼ פ ֟ ִ ֯ע ָ ֮֕ן ׸ , ד ֻ ֮ , ָ ן ָ֬ ָ, ִ֕ ә ׿ֿ ֕ ֜ ׿ֿ ֛-֛ ד ֟ , ִ֕ ֻ֟ Ӥ ֟ , ו ִ֕ כ׾֮֕ ִõ ֛ , ֛ ִ֟ ָָ ד ָ ܟ ֲӤ ֋ ֮ ָ ׮֬׸ ־ֿ , ו ָ ־ָ ָ ָָ ϴ ֡ ֮֟ Ӥ ֤ ֲ ݵ ֌ ֋ ָ ָ ׸ ݵ ֋ ֤֯ ֮֟ ֣ ֻ ֮ þֵ ִ ׻֯ ֮֕ן ׸ ָ ָև ָָ ָ ֿ ֮ ִ֕ ֕ , ָ߲ , ֟ , ׿ ã֮ ֜ þã ד ֮ - ָ ״ֻ ֮֟ ָָ ӿ ֮ ӿ ָָ פ ֮ ֜֋, ߤ (ִ֯)

00 ׻ֵ (ָӛ) : ֳ֯ן , þã ӡֵֻ ָ ֓ ׻֋ ֛ ֳ֯ן , ӡֵֻ ו ֤ ֤ؕ ָ ܟ ֺ ֛ ָ ֲ ֮ ָ ֲ 韵 ָ ֮ ֌ gynaecologist և ֺ ֌ ٙױ ֺ ֌ ָ ֲ ֓ ֟ ֌ ִ֮ , ִָ , ו֮ ָ ׾ ָ ׾ ָ ו֮ ֮ ך ׸ִ ו֮ ָ ׮ֵ ִ ֵօ , ׾ֿ ִֻ ו֮ 17 ָ ִָ ï֙ ֓ ϟָ ֣ transplant of kidney and liver both ָ ߾ָ ָ ִ ָ ׾ ߲ ֲֻֻ ֓ ֕ multiple organ transplant technology ֻ ֻֻ߯ ֯ә֮ ָ ָߵ ֌ 18 ә ך ׸ִ ߮ כ ָ֮ ףֵ ϟָ ָ ֮ ך ִ ֲ ֯ ߾ָ ֯ә ֯ ָߕ ֛ ָ ֮ ֛ ֲ ֯ ֯ә ֛ ָ և ֮ ֛

(2M ָ ֿ:)

GS-RSS/2M/1.55

00 ׻ֵ (֟) : ֙ , ך ׸ִ , ֻײ ֻ , ײֻ--ָ߱ ִ֟ ֤ ָ

ֳ֯ן , ָ þã ӡֵֻ ӡֵֻ , ו ָ ה ï֙ ֟ , ևԾ ï֙ ֵ, ־֮Դ ï֙ ֵ, , ײֻ--ָ߱ ߙ ִ , Mr. Minister, do you understand Hindi? If not, then the interpretation facility is there.

ָ, כ ֈ׮ֻ ֱ כ ׸֛ , ־֮Դ ֱ כ ֟֟ ߲-߲ ӓ ָ כ ׌֮ ָ וÙ ֲ ֤֕ , ֻ֮ ׻֋ ֵ ֵ ֌ ֮֯ 35 ߅ ߴ׸ , ָ ߴ׸ ִ ֮֟ , ֌ ֌ ֮ 2000 ֕ ֤֯ ֮ ֻ ֤֯ ָ ֕ , ־֮Դ 59 ֮ , פ 1800 ָ ֋ 1700 ָ ֋, ָ ִ־ ֮ ߔ ֌ ֮֯ ߔ 80 , , ֜? ָ ֯־ָ ָ 2002 ׻ ֻ ֻ֮ ߴ ֻև , ֆָ֋ ֻև , כי ֻ ׌׾Ù ֮ ֟ ֵ ߲ ֜ 35 ִ ֻ ֣ ߲ ׌׾Ù ߮ ָ ָ ֵ, ֌ , -כ Ùֱ ӡ خ ֵ ? ֯ Ӿ ֙ ꌙ - ߴ׸ , ָ ֟ ֵ ֵ֟ ֙ ꌙ ֵ, ֙ ߛ ׻֋ և ֙ ꌿ֮ ֮ ? ևי ֛ , ׸ , ֛ , Ù׻ֵ ָ ָ ֓ ֮ , ֲ ï֙ ֓ ֟ , כי ׌׾Ù ֓ ֮֕ ֯֟ ׻ ֟ (2 ָ ָ)

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