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2A/HMS-SKC/1.00

ӕ߳և ֙ (֟) : - ־ ֮ ײֻ ֵ ֵ , ײֻ þ֟

, - ֮ ß־֮ ӟ , Sir, I quote- "We hope that the agenda for tiger conservation will be secured so that the tiger can be secured. It will need seriousness; it will need a commitment".

ֳ֬ , ׾ֹ ָ ָָ ָ ׾ֵ ߮ ֟ ײֻ ֮ ֱ ײֻ ֣״ ִֻ ߮֟ ָ , ָ ײֻ ֕֙ ֮ ֵ ֵ , ױ ֲֵ ֵ ֡ ֵօ ָ ָ-ָ ߔ ֋ ָ ָָ serious ֟ committed. ָ, ֮ ֟ ֯ ־ פ protection, illegal trade, domestic enforcement, innovative protection, research, relocation, coexistence, fringe, tourism, ecological services פ ִ׾™ ֳ ָ ִֵ ֵԤ ָ ׾ß ֓ ֮ ׿ , ׻֋ ™ ־ֿ ز֤ ָ ֓ օ ָ, - ֵ֟ ָ 150 וֻ ևָ כÙ , ևָ ֣--֣ ו֮ ևֻ ־ ֵ֟ "The official conservation apparatus gives protection for the sake of the tiger; equally forests in these areas are under greater strain. Fear forbids the use of forests, but people persist in doing so, often out of sheer need." ֮ ֑ habitat ֮ ֙ ־ֿֆ ٟ ׾ ևָ ֻ Ӿ ֤ - The Tiger Task Force visited Hindla village in Ranthambore and witnessed terrible poverty of these people living inside this prestigious National Park. They have no water, no schools, no medical facilities. They are harassed... " , ãן ֵ: ֮-Ϥ ָ օ : ևָ כÙ פ, ֮־ֵ ָ߲ ָ ӳ߸ ֤ ֮ ™ ֮ ֮-߾ ֟ ֻ , ֮֟ (2 /ߋ־ ָ ֿ:)

PSV-HK/2b/1.05

ӕ߳և ֙ (֟): ֮־ָ , פ ָ ֤֕ 59 ֻ ֋, ֮ ֻ ֤ פ ֻ BPL ߮ ֻ פֵ ܵ ֲ ֤ ֮ֆ ־֕ ãן ָ פ֟ ֮ ֮ ֻ פ ֕ - ֻֿ - ֟ ױ ָ ו֋ ? ֮ ֤֕ ״ֻ֟

ֵָ, ׬ֵ֮־ ָ ߓ , ֵָ ָ פֵ ãן ֟ ֕ ֵָ ֤ ֟ , Ӥ ߅ -

ָ ָ ֆ,

, ׻ֵ, ӕָ פֆ,

ו֮ ֕ ָ,

֨ӕ׻ ִٯ֟ , ֮־ֵ Ӥ , ֵָ ָ ֕ , ֟ ֻ֟ օ

ָ֟,

֮, ֯ ߾֮ ߟ֟,

֮ ,

־ ,

ו֮ ֕ ָ,

פ ָ ֮ ֙ - ֻ֟ , ֮ ׻֋ , ֲ֕ ִ֟ ִ ֻ֟ ֮֟ , ָ á -

֟ ן ִ֯˅

ָ: ׮ ־׮օ

ִ֟ ׻֋ ִ ֻ ֮־ֵ ֮ ֤ , ֮ ٣ ֳ ׻֋ ֮ ֟ ֑ ֻ, , פ ֮ ׻֋ ֵ

֮֮ߵ ֳ֬ , ֮־ֵ ֮ ׮ֻ֮ ֟ ֻ, ֮־ֵ ֮ ׮ֻ֮ ֮ ãן ֮ ֟ ־ פ , ־ԣ ݵ , - "Policy must accept that the people will continue to live in protected areas. It is not possible to settle the rights and relocate all the families in the reserves." ָ, - "The rights of people cannot be expunged without providing alternatives." ָ, - "The tigers habitat cannot be secured unless we secure the future of the millions who live on the fringe." ֟ - "In order for resource use to be destructive, the participation of local communities in decision making and in management becomes essential. Regulation is best possible if all are parties to the decision."

־ ־֕ ֮ ן ֮ ߾ ן , ײי ִ֮ ֕ ֮ פ ֮ ֻ פ/֮־ֵ ̸֕֕ ןֵ ֮֟ և ֟: ֮ ֮ ߾ , ֱ֟ ״ֻ, ׻ ָ ֮ օ ָ ָָ ֮ ֯ 1992 ֮ ֮־ֵ ׮Ե ׻ֵ ֵ ֮ ־ã, Joint Forest Management, ֻ և ևԅ - ֻ , ֿ ֳ , ָ ֕ ֻ ׮š פ֟ ֮-ִ֤ ֛ ֮ ָ ֮ ߾ ׾ֵ (2/000 ָ ֿ:)

2C/klg-sk/1.10

ӕ߳և ֙ (֟) : ֮־ֵ ֣ ן ֮֮ ֕ ָ ָָ ָ , ־ ֕ The wild Life (Protection) Amendment Bill, 2005 ֤ ֵ ֵ , ϴ ӿ֮ ֮־ ָ ֮־ ֕׾ ִõ ִ֮֬ ׻֋ ֻ֟ ֮ , ֻ֟ ֵ ׾ֵ Task Force ï™ ־, ו֮ , ָ ָָ ֮ ֮ ן ָ ֟

ֳ֬ , ־ֻ ־ֻ ײֻ ֮־ֵ ֕׾ ׻֋ ־֮֬ ֵ ? , ָ ־ֻ ־ֲ , ֮ ֮ ߾ ך ײֻ ֵ֮ ֤ ־ ֣ ָ߲ ִ ֮ ֻ ָָ, וִ ײֻ ֮ ֻ ӡֵֻ ״֡ פ ֕ ӡ , ו ָָ ָ ִ֯ӣ ״֡ ִ֣Ԯ , ָ߲ פֵ և

, ײֻ ָ 38V (4) ׻ subject to the provisions contained in this Act, the State Government shall, while preparing a Tiger Conservation Plan, ensure the agricultural, livelihood, developmental and other interests of the people living in tiger bearing forests or a tiger reserve. ִ livelihood ֿ , ָ ֮ ׻ֵ Ӳ׬֟ ֕ ָָ ֋, ֕ ״֟ ׻֋ ָ ָָ ָ֮׿ ֮ ֛ ײֻ ־֮֬ , ֤ օ

־ ֮ ֛ Forest Conservation Act ֻ֟ ׾ ׻֋ ӕև ? ־ָ ֻ ֵ ֵ? ֟ ֮ ֮ , ו֮֟ ײֻ ֟և և ָ ߮ ֮ ׻֋ ֮ ӯ ֮ , FCA ִ ֬ ֮֟ ׻֋ ֟ ֲ ֟ ֱ ד-֛ ֟

ָ 38X (1) Tiger Conservation Foundation ã֮֯ , Eco-development by involvement of people ִ ï™ ״ֻ , ֵ ׻֋ ֮ ֵ ֵ?

ӿ׬֟ ײֻ ָ 38L National Tiger Conservation Authority ֚ ָ 38U ֕ Steering Committee ֚ օ ã ֮־ , ևֻ ן׮׬֟ פ ֵ ֈӛ ֻ ָ ֵ , ׻֋ ã ׻֋ ֛ ֮ ֻ֟ ׻֋ ײֻ ӿ֮ ׻֋ ӿ֮ ־ -

That at page 2, line 25, for the words 'three members of Parliament', the words " three members of Parliament representing constituencies/ places having Tiger Sanctuary or National Park area" be substituted.

ָ ִ ևֻ ִ ׻֮ ߱ , 댓 ֻ֮ , ٻִֵ ֤õ ן׮׬֟ , ֮ ӟ־

ָ - That at page 5, after line 34, the following be inserted namely:-

" (c) three tribal members to be elected by the State Assembly:

Provided that if there is Legislative Council in a State, one out of the three members shall be elected by the Legislative Council." 2/ ָ

-SK/YSR-AKA/1.15/2D

ӕ߳և ֙ (֟) : ֣-֣ ־ և և כߕ֮ ßָ ָ י ֮, וִ֮ tribals ן׮׬֟ פ ֋ ֮־ֵ ֕׾ ׻֋ ï™ ־֮֬ ֋

ӟ פ ևָ ײֻ ׻ the moot point in looking at so many solutions is a simple one. Ease the pressure on people, people respond sustainably. Ease the pressure on the forest, the forest will regenerate. The pressure on the tiger is bound to ease. This paradigm of 'inclusive conservation' will safeguard the tiger. Nothing else will. The agenda is within our reach.

ֳ֬ , ְ ײֻ ә , ә ֿ֟ פ ָָ ֮ ְ ײֻ ӿ֮ ß־ ֤ ߤ ӿ֮ ֮־ֵ ֟ , ֟ ֋ ӿ֮ ׻֋ ևָ ֮ ֵ ֮־ֵ ־֮֬ ֿ ֋

ӟ , ֿ ־ , ־ֿ ׸֟Ԯ ָָ ײֻ ָ ֻ ߅ ֮־֤ (ִ֯)

DR. KARAN SINGH (NCT OF DELHI): Mr. Vice-Chairman, Sir, I would like to congratulate the Government on bringing forward this important piece of legislation. I would like to give a little background because I was personally involved in the creation and administration of Project Tiger. In 1970, when I was a Cabinet Minister in Mrs. Indira Gandhi's Cabinet, I was appointed by her Chairman of the Indian Board for Wildlife. It was then known as Indian Board for Wildlife. Now I am told it is National Board for Wildlife. In that capacity, when I had the first meeting, Mr. Vice-Chairman, I realised that the national animal at that time was the lion. The Ashoka lions are there. Our national chinha is lion. Therefore, the national animal at that time was the lion. It struck me that the lion is found only in one corner of India, in the Gir Forest, whereas the tiger is found throughout the length and breadth of India -- from the Himalayans right down to Kerala and from the West all the way to Assam and West Bengal. So, I brought this matter up, and in the Indian Board for Wildlife, we passed a resolution urging the Government to change the national animal from the lion to the tiger. This is not very much known, so, I thought I should give you its background. That resolution went before the Cabinet, and the Cabinet under Indiraji took a decision to change the national animal. This is the first important point that I must mention. Once the tiger was accepted as a national animal, at our next meeting the proposal that I put forward was that the tiger was gravely endangered. Sir, it was estimated that at the turn of the century in 1900, there were, at least, 100,000 tigers in India. By the time we took over, the number had already dwindled to between 4000 and 5000. So, we said that if we would make it national animal, then we would have to also set up a project to preserve it. In 1972, we were responsible for the Wildlife Protection Act, which is now being amended, and I put forward the proposal of Project Tiger. We selected nine projects, to begin with, in nine states. That was accepted by the Government, and in April, 1973, I inaugurated Project Tiger in the Corbett National Park. That was how Project Tiger began. For ten years, when I was in Mrs. Gandhi's Cabinet up to 1977, I remained President of the Indian Board for Wildlife and President of the Steering Committee of Project Tiger. (Contd. by VKK/2E)

-YSR/VKK-MCM/2e/1.20

DR. KARAN SINGH (CONTD.): So, if we had not launched this project, by now, there would not have been a single tiger left in India. With the Prime Minister's support, she was very supportive, I did it and I got an excellent Director of Project Tiger, one K.S. Sankhala, from Rajasthan. He was the first Director of Project Tiger and we began this process. Now, thirty-three years later, the Project has grown to 28 Tiger Projects in 17 States. But, I am afraid the number of tigers has not grown. In fact, there is reason to believe that the number of tigers has diminished. Now, Sir, tiger is such a beautiful animal; it is a glorious animal. Singhvahini, if you look at Durga riding upon the tiger! Incidentally, one other point Panditji, you may know, the Durga who rides on the lion is known as Vishnu-Durga and the Durga riding on the tiger is known as Shiva-Durga. This is another interesting point. Many people ask: What is the vaahan of Durga? It depends on which Durga you are praying to. I happen to pray to Lord Shiva. So, I prefer Shiva-Durga who rides on the tiger. The tiger is sacred to Ayyappan also, a South Indian deity.

It has suffered terrible times. First of all, it suffered as a result of the machismo and desire to prove the manhood of the Rajas, Maharajas and the Viceroys. I must admit that. There was one Maharaja, whose name I won't mention, who killed 101 tigers. It was supposed to be a great praakarm, to kill tiger. That was unfortunately so. They were massacred. Then, the Viceroys or the British Governors who came here had to shoot one tiger during their stay here because that was the sign of their virility and manhood. ו ևָ ֟ ֋ Then, after Independence, Tiger Safaris began. Before we banned it, they were actual Safaris. Tourists came and paid ten or twenty thousand dollars and they would take them to shoot. That was the second thing. That was banned. There are two dangers to the tiger -- deforestation which is the ecological disaster for this country and the second is, poaching. Sir, tiger skins were available throughout the world. They were poached here for tiger parts, tiger bones, etc. Unfortunately, in the Chinese medicines, tiger bones are supposed to have some aphrodisiac properties to increase virility. Therefore, first of all, the arrogance of the feudal order, then, the attempts to bring tourism into it and finally, the lack of self-confidence evidently among whoever buys these medicines, tiger is vanishing.

Sariska, as has been mentioned, was the easiest place to see a tiger. It was within three hours' driving distance from Delhi, only next to Alwar. Tigers in Sariska are wiped out. Tigers in Ranthombore are in great difficulty. So, while I would congratulate the Government for having extended the tiger reserves to 27 in different States, it is now long overdue that this sort of a situation, this sort of a structure, the National Tiger Conservation Authority, should come into being. It has come very late. If it had come twenty years earlier, it would have been better. We might have saved some of the tigers. But it has come, -ֵ֤-ß-ֵ֤, as they say.

Tiger is facing a severe crisis. In fact, on television, I described it as a terminal crisis because, Sir, when species fall below the biological minimum, then it seizes to grow. These 27 tiger reserves are scattered throughout the country. Therefore, in each tiger reserve, unless there is a sufficient minimum, a critical minimum, of tigers, they will not breed, they will not grow. So, it is not a minute too late. It may already be too late. But, at least, it is worth trying that this National Tiger Conservation Authority is being set up and also the Tiger and Other Endangered Species Crime Control Bureau.

Sir, there are well-known poachers who have been poaching for 30 years. They go to courts and they escape. They are still in jail. I don't see anybody having been sentenced to any serious imprisonment for poaching. And yet, if you go to Tibet, if you go to Nepal, if you go to China, you can buy tiger skin in the streets. So, this is a terrible racket; it is an international racket. They are big mafias who organise this. They pay a few thousands of rupees to some locals, they kill the tiger and then, they take it away. (Contd. by MKS/2f)

-VKK/MKS/GS/1.25/2F

DR. KARAN SINGH (CONTD.): So, this is an important point and this is something which needs to be stressed.

Sir, there are just two more things which I would like to say here. One is that generally, the forest cover in this country is shrinking. The satellite photographs show us that our forest cover is less than ten per cent although the official figures, I think, are 16 per cent or 20 per cent.

SHRI AJAY MAROO: It is 23 per cent.

DR. KARAN SINGH: Twenty-three per cent is the official figure, but I don't want to challenge the Government on that. But the figures that one sees from the satellite photographs are much less. And this deforestation is causing erosion, soil erosion. It is causing disruption. It is destroying the environment. Now, the tigers, please remember, Sir, is the tip of the ecological pyramid. It is not the tiger that we only protect. When we choose the Tiger Project, the whole ecology of that area is protected, the plants, the animals, the deer, all the other animals, the monkeys and all that. So, this is really a major ecological attempt to prevent further deterioration, and that is something which should get top priority.

Sir, the question of human habitation in and around forest reserves is a very important point. There has been a lot of unfortunate controversy about this, but we are very clear that human habitations--not all of them are tribal; most of them are tribal; some of them are non-tribal also--must receive adequate attention; where necessary, there could even be some relocation outside the reserves because if you have a village bang in the middle of a tiger reserve then you can't really expect the tiger to be protected. So, special care has to be taken, particularly for the adivasis and the other vanvasis, the village dwellers who are also in a very poor economic condition. They should also be involved. The ideal thing would be if their habitations there cooperate in the process of the Tiger development. They must have a vested interest in it; if there is tourism there, they should get some advantage of that; they should get employment, and their minor forest products and all, they should get. But one thing that should not be done is deforestation, further deforestation, in the name of distributing land to forest dwellers. That would be disastrous, Sir, because what will happen is, the poor forest dwellers will get some land. The land mafia is very strong in this country. The land mafias will come and they will pay them some token amount of money; they will cut down the timber, and, before you know what is happening, then the forests will disappear. Therefore, we have to be very careful; while fully safeguarding and protecting the interests of the tribal population, we must see that the land mafias and the timber mafias do not take over our reserves. Sir, if this is done, and if the Endangered Species Crime Control Bureau becomes effective, and if, particularly, the Tiger Conservation Authority has representatives of the tribal communities also, I think, it is the last ditch effort--I do not know whether it will succeed or not--to save this glorious animal, which is our National Animal, which is a symbol of our pride, of our power, of our dignity, and I would like to congratulate the two Ministers for having brought this. I would warmly suggest that this Bill should be unanimously passed by the House. Thank you, Sir. (Ends)

SHRI K. NATWAR SINGH (RAJASTHAN): Sir, can you allow me to speak for one second?

THE VICE-CHAIRMAN (SHRI KALRAJ MISHRA): Yes.

SHRI K. NATWAR SINGH: I want to say, Sir, that if you read the Collected Works of Jwaharlal Nehru, there are about 100 letters addressed to him, and he is addressed by Panjditji, "Dear Tiger"! So, it is appropriate that a two-legged Tiger should be speaking about a four-legged Tiger! (Ends)

ֳ֬ : ֮֯ ֤ פ פ (Followed by 2G)

SC/1.30/2G

֮ ֤ (ָ Ϥ) : ֳ֬ , ֯ - ֮־֤ ֮֕߾ (Ӹ) ӿ֮ ׾֬, 2005 ָ ֮֯ ֮ ָ Ϥ֮ օ ֮֕߾ ׻֋ ָָ ָ֟ ϵ , ׻֋ ֮ ֮֮ ִ , ָ ϵ , ִ ו֮֟ ֱ֟ ״ֻ֮ , ֮ ֱ֟ ֯ ֮֕߾ ־ֻ , ܵ ָ֟ ֙ , ָ ֵ , ֱ , ֮֟ ׿ָ ܵ ָ֟ ֮ ߾ ϕןֵ , ו֮ ֵԾָ ֲ ֲ ֺ , ֣ ִִ ֮ ֵ ־֕ ׾ֻ㯟 ֑ ֮֕߾ ֓־ Ӹ ׻֋ ָָ ָ ֵ ֋ ֮֕߾ ׬׮ִֵ-1972 ֲӬ ־ã ֵ ֮֕߾ ׿ָ ו ֮֕߾ Ϥ֮ ֵ߅ ָ ֵ ֵ Գ ϕןֵ ֮֕߾ , ו֮ ß֟ ָ֟ ֛ ֵ , ֮֓ ׻֋ ֮֕߾ ׬׮ִֵ-1972 ד ״ֻ ֵ ו ֮֕߾ 1972 ׮ִֵ ֮ ו ֛ ףֵָ ֮֕߾ ׿ָ ֋, ֛ ףֵָ ̲ ׻ֵ ֋օ ִ ֕ ׬ , ֮֜ ִ ֵօ ֮֕߾ , ׻֋ ֵ ֋ ܵ ׮ֵԟ , ߵ ߵ, ֵԻֵ ֋ ™ߵ ֮ ֵָ ׾ ֵօ Ϭִ֮ӡ ֟ ֮ 2002 ™ߵ ֮֕߾ ֵ ֮ ֵ֮ ֵ߅ ֲ ֤ ָ ֮֕߾ ϕןֵ , ֵ֓ ֮ ִß ֵ ־֕ ܵ ֙, ׿ָ ָ, ֮־ָ ֯ ׳֛ ָօ ו ָ ֮ , ֱ , ָ ֟־ָ , ָӓֻ ֑ ֮֓ ָ ן 1972 ֮ ֮, ָ ָӓֻ ֕ ֱ ײ֟ օ ָӓֻ ֕ ֑ ܵ ָ֟ ԅ ָ ܵ , ֲ ߮ ϴ ָ - ֑ þ֔ ׾ָ֓ ֟־ָ ״ֻ֮, ֵԯ ֮ ״ֻ֮ ֤ֆ ӯ ״ֻ֮ ָ ֯ ֛ ָ ָӓֻ ֮ ׾ֳ ׸ ָ ָӓֻ ֕ ֮֮ ֤ ָ ֑ ֯ ֛և ָ ֋, 12 ֑ ן ֵ, 1 ֑ ׿ָ ָ ֻօ ֳ֬ , 18 ָ֤ ֯ ֛ ֮ ֮ ־և ׮ֵ , ֯ ֛ 13 ׮ֵ ָ ֵ (2 ָ ֿ:)

MP/2H/1.35

֮ ֤ (֟) : ָߵ ֮ ߾ ã֮ ևָ ׸̾ ֻ֮ ֑ ֮֟ ־׬ פ ֮־ָ ֋, ֛ ִ ꅠ ߾ ׮ ֤ ֑ þ֓ ֮ ׻֋ 50 80 ߙ ֱ ֑ 50 200 ߙ ִ ֑ ֣ ָ ӓ ֤ ֑ , ãן פ ֱ ֮ ߾ ֮ ִ , ֯ ֛ ִ ֯ ֛ ߅

֮ ׮ ָ ֑ ָ ָ֤ ָ ӓ ֤֋ , ֲ ֮ ߾ ֮ ײ ֟Դ֮ ָӓֻ ֻ 88 ֑ 128 ֤ ֑ ָ ֮ ߾ ׾ֿ ֵ ֮ ֋, ָӓֻ ֻ 300 ֤ ֑ ־ֿ ָ ӟ֮ ֑ ߓ ָ ָӓֻ 2005 ֮ ָ ָ֤ ܵ 779 ֤ ָ֤ 842 , ػ֮֟ ָ ףֵ ػ֮֟ , ֕ ֮ 1510 ֣ ֟֋ ֋ ִ 265 ֵ ָ ֣, 400 ֵ ֤ ֣ ֣ ֟ ӓ ָӓֻ ػ֮֟ , ִ ӟ֮ ָ 101 ֣ ָ ֋, וִ ָ , ׿׸ ָ ָ ֋, ײֻ֕ ָ ֋, ּ֮ ָ ָ ֋, ֯ ׳֛ 13 ףֵ ֮ ֮ Ӿևԅ

ֳ֬ , ֕ã֮ ײֻ ϕן ָ ֑ , ܵ ֣ ֙ , ؓ֟ ׾ֵ ִ֣ ™ߵ ֮ ֲ ֑ ֮ , ֟ ֻ ֮ 21 ֑ ֋ ֋, ֲ ִ֣ ֑ ܵ 45 47 ߓ ߅ ֪ׯ ֮ ׬ָ ֟ ָ ׿ָ ֑ ֲֵ ӲӬ ӓ ׻֋ ֮և և, ו ֟ ߟ ֵָ ߅ ׸, ִ֣ ָ ֑ ָ ֮ ׸ Ϭ֮ ӡ ֮ ׸ ׸ ִ֣ ֑ ֕ ָָ ָ֯ ֕ , ִ ֕ ָָ ָ ׸ ֵ ֕ ָָ ָ֯ ֕ ׿׸ ֑ ָ, וִ ֮ ׾ֳ ׬ָ ã֮ߵ , ִ ֛ օ.

ֳ֬ , ֟ ָ ָ ֛ ִֵ , ו ֤֮֯ ֟ , ֤֮֯ , և׸ ָ ָ ֛ ִֵ ֟ ͅ (2 / ָ ֿ:)

ASC-TDB/1.40/2J

֮ ֤ (֟) : ϕ֮֮ ִ ֲ ٴֵ ָ ֲ ֮ ִֵ ֟ , ִִ ׮ִֵ ֮ ־֕ , ֵ ֛ ׿ָ , ֯ ִ֬ ָָ , ֟ , ֪ׯ ׻֋ ֮ , ֵ ׿ָ , ֱֻ ֵԾ ־ֿ

ӟ , ֮ ֟ ִ֯ ׮־ ָ ֻ ֮ ߾ , ֕ ϕןֵ ׾ֻ㯟 ָ , ׿׸ , ֮ ד֟ ־ã , ׻֋ ִ ָ ־ֿ ָ ϴ ز֤ - ָ ָ ָ ֮ , ָ-ָ ִִ פ ןֵ ߾֕Ԯ ֮֬ , ״߮ ֻ כ ֙, ֮ ߾֕Ԯ ִ ֮ ִ߮ ָ, ָ ֮ ן ָָ ָ ֮֕ןֵ , פ , , ֮ ִ ֋ ִ߮ ִ ֋, ָָ , - ָָ ֮ ִ ֋ ӟ , ֮ ֟ ִ֯ ָ ֮ ߾ , ׻֋ ָָ ו֮֟ ׮ִֵ ֮ , ֿ ֮֋ - ֮־֤ (ִ֯) (2K/KGG ָ ָ)

KGG/2K/1.45

SHRI MOINUL HASSAN (WEST BENGAL): Sir, I rise to support the Wild Life Protection (Amendment) Bill, 2005 with some critical observations. I hope, the hon. Minister would give some attention to my observations. Sir, we know that it is a very important piece of legislation concerning the ecological balance of our nature. I firmly believe that protection of wild life is very, very essential to maintain the ecological balance of nature. But, sometimes, we see in newspaper reports that at many places some wild life is unnecessarily destroyed by those who belong to the upper class of our society. They are in the habit to miss this, to lose this, to shoot this precious wildlife of the world--it may be a lion, may be a tiger, may be a black deer. I firmly believe, this piece of legislation is not to protect this type of heinous attitude hundred per cent, but I believe that this important piece of legislation will try to protect our wild life. So, in this context I would like to see the inner sight of this Bill, which is stated in a para. Sir, these are only my suggestions. I am not moving any amendments. Why am I not moving? I have seen in the last two-three weeks, the Minister-in-charge of the Ministry moves a lot of amendments on the Bills and I also agree with the amendments which have been moved by the hon. Minister. They may be my amendments also! So, there is no difference between his amendment and mine. I am not moving any amendment. But I have two-three suggestions so far as the Bill is concerned.

On page 2, there is a mention of 'National Tiger Conservation Authority shall consist...." Then it is mentioned about the membership of that Authority to consist of the Minister in charge of the Ministry, the Minister of State in the Ministry, three Members of Parliament from both Houses who will be in the Authority, etc. I would like to say that we are all Members of Parliament enjoying equal status. My suggestion is, if it is possible, please provide one Member of Parliament who is elected from the Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes from a Parliamentary constituency which is reserved for the Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes in this Authority to be a Member out of the 3 or 4 Members of Parliament. This is one proposal of mine so far as the Bill is concerned.

There is another proposal from the Minister for a committee, the Steering Committee which is constituted by the State Government. I have seen the list of this committee, but there is no representation of the Member of Parliament representing that particular State. It should consist of a Member of Parliament. A Member of Parliament who is working in the particular constituency and particular State, should be included in this important committee. It is the piece of legislation by the Central Government, and it would be the Government of India Act. So, I propose like this.

Secondly, there is no representation of MLAs also. It should be incorporated. This is my suggestion so far as the two committees are concerned.

I have another suggestion so far as the Bill is concerned. On page 6, clause 38V (4), I take your indulgence to read out the para, "Subject to the provisions contained in this Act, the State Government shall, while preparing a Tiger Conservation Plan, ensure the agricultural, livelihood, developmental and other interests of the people living in tiger bearing forests or a tiger reserve." I would like to emphasise on the last two words, 'tiger reserve'. I would like the hon. Minister to replace the word reserve out of core area. If it is possible, I would humbly request that this suggestion be considered. (Contd. by kls/2l)

KLS/2L-1.50

SHRI MOINUL HASSAN (CONTD): Thirdly, another important point I would like to mention here is this. It is not in the main Bill but it is in the amendments moved by the hon. Minister, Mr. A. Raja, Minister in-charge of this Department. I am referring to clause 3, which is going to be amended. Sir, I have already pointed out that there is a heinous attempt to destroy our wildlife like tigers, black deer and other animals. All of us know that there are many attempts like this by some people who are living in the higher strata of society and they shoot black deer, they shoot tigers, etc. in order to get joyful moment during their leisure. It is an offence; it is commitment of an offence. What is happening in this regard and what provision you have made in this regard so that such offences do not take place? Here the punishment clause says that it will not be less than three years, but may extend to seven years. It is correct and I support it. But what is the fine amount? It is not less than Rs.50,000. Why should it not be less than one lakh? What is the criterion for keeping it Rs.50,000? It should not be less than one lakh. Rs.50,000 is nothing for those people who are committing such types of offences on various occasions at many places. It should be above Rs.50,000. ...(Interruptions)... If it is not less than Rs.50,000 then why should it not be more than Rs.1,00,000? My intention to say this is that it should be like capital punishment. Another important point is that in the Statement of Objects and Reasons there is one line -- I support the Bill -- 'the rights of the tribal people living in and around the tiger reserves'. Sir, it is an important point and I would like to say that this piece of legislation will protect the rights of the tribal people and other people living in this area. So far as tribals are concerned, the right of living, the right of water, etc. should be protected. I am very much happy that the Statement of Objects and Reasons say 'ensuring the agricultural, livelihood, developmental and other interests of people living inside forests or in the tiger bearing forest areas in and around a tiger reserve. I would like to submit that it should be maintained and it should be implemented throughout the country wherever these types of reserves are situated. (Time-bell) I will take two-three minutes only. When the Statement of Objects and Reasons mentions about 28 reserves in 17 different States, I would like to submit that I belong to West Bengal. The hon. Minister knows the name of Sunderbans, which is one of the beautiful places as far as our country, is concerned. It is a very, very rare experience to see tigers in Sunderbans. I have had occasions to visit Sunderbans many times, maybe, ten or fifteen times. But I am such a person who has not yet seen any tiger in Sunderbans. I would like to submit that it is not Sariska, it is not Ranthambore but Sunderbans is all the time Sunderbans. (Contd by 2M)

-KLS-SSS/2M/1.55

SHRI MOINUL HASSAN (CONTD.): There is a dense forest, there is a river, there is an ocean, and there is land. A peculiar inhabitation is there. So, I would like to request the Minister that the Government should try its best to provide sufficient funds to protect the tiger reserves as far as Sundarbans Tiger Reserve Forest in our State is concerned. With these words, I support the Bill and conclude. Thank you. (Ends)

DR. K. KASTURIRANGAN (NOMINATED): Mr. Vice-Chairman, Sir, at the outset, I should say that the Wildlife Protection Amendment Bill, 2005 is both timely and appropriate. I would like to compliment the Ministry of Environment and Forests and the hon. Minister for introducing this Bill, which is so important at this juncture, primarily because we have a national concern over the dwindling population of the Tigers. The Sariska experience has been none too good in the context of conservation and preservation and there are other locations also where such things could be happening on which we do not have the full information. So, the entire Bill envisages these things that it shall not repeat and we strengthen those of the mechanisms that are critical for both preservation and conservation. As Dr. Karan Singh mentioned, hundred years ago we had something like a hundred thousand tigers in the world. Today, it has dwindled by almost an order of magnitude. I think, it is almost something like 8000 tigers all over the world. Of course, one need not seek too far in terms of the reasons for this. There is, of course, the question of poaching, the habitation laws and, ultimately, of course, the population fragmentation. In all these kind of things, particularly if one looks at the habitation laws you have the problem of population increase, resettlement, agricultural activities, and deforestation. These all add up to the problems related to the tiger number dwindling. So, it is against this background that, of course, India had taken some very pioneering and visionary steps and the hon. Member Dr. Karan Singh himself shared his own experience of pioneering this activity as a part of conservation planning way back in 1972. A Task Force under his leadership was created. This was the first launched official Tiger Conservation Programme.

(MR. DEPUTY CHAIRMAN in the Chair)

Of course, then, it was followed by another equally important study that was conducted and that was in 1983 under the Chairmanship of late Madhavrao Scindia which focussed on the dependents of the rural people on the forest which had also its implications. The tigers are important, of course. Why do we consider all these as important steps? There are several reasons why we want to make sure that we have a programme for conservation and preservation of tigers. As one of my colleagues mentioned, it is one of the important elements of maintaining the health of an ecological system. So, that is one reason why we should have tigers around and it is also one of the top predators. It plays a key role on the population check. That could be the second reason. But, to me the most important reason is the fact that it gives a very good rationale for creating eco-systems, which are critical for the overall environmental integrity of the country. The tiger comes in handy because it is a very unique animal because it can survive under different geographical conditions, climatic conditions and so on. This provides it a very unique capability. But specific to one of the things that I would like to say is the previous speaker spoke about the Bengal tiger which occupies a very important position not only because of the reasons that he mentioned but it has also been the progeny of white tigers in the country; and if you look at the population of white tigers, of course, it is virtually on the verge of extinction, just 12 white tigers have been sighted over the last several years. It is not an errand genetic reason why you have the white tigers. About 10,000 mutations of a regular tiger you get one white tiger. (Contd. by NBR/2N)

 

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